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David Granger: A profile on the move

There is guarded hope for progress in this society; it resides with David Granger.  The reasons for this growing belief are manifold; a few are shared.

Amidst the tumult over coalescing or not coalescing he was the picture of unruffled calm.  During the swirling, at times intemperate, public discussion of who should be what, he remained imperturbably cool.  It is during these times that the nature of the man and an inkling of his style, approach, and methods slowly become more discernible.  His work is careful, his fingerprints undeniable.  The final results of the APNU/AFC merger talks reveal the handiwork of many behind-the-scenes toilers and, in the vanguard, a leader gaining in stature, if not appeal.  There is much disciplined thinking going on here, much careful weighing, and a much consideration on the involvement of the people, through real inclusion and real responsibilities, if not real authority.  I submit that this is heavily influenced by Mr. Granger.

Additionally, there is now in blueprint a competitive, if not superior, cross-sectional team to any around.  There is the declared structure, power clusters, and decision points.  There is also a spreading of the wealth, and an emphasis on inclusion and a broad-based front.  There is an attempt to bind diverse elements and different visions into a practical whole.  Time will tell.  Last, the people are invited onto the governance stage via a smorgasbord of opinions, outlooks, and opportunities, if not overtures.  This can work; if trusted by the Guyanese people, it will work.  It cannot be worse than what exists now.  Again, time will tell if this will gain in health, and develop muscle; and whether putting trust in yet another prince will bring lifting up.  It starts with the promise, a promise only.  It is all that this society has; it has nothing more, perhaps nothing left.  And it begins with promise.
This is what David Granger projects, and there are a few things that set him apart from predecessors and lend further credence.

By any standards, Mr. Granger has had a successful career.  He has risen, he has persevered; now he must overcome within and without in this his second career.  Unlike the incumbent leader, and prior ones, he has neither point to prove, nor dues to pay, including the political ones.  He can celebrate the party and be of the party, but there is no inflexible, fanatical dedication to the foremost and sacrosanct nature of the party.  Sure, he is strongly committed, but there is, I believe, a more powerful commitment to and care for this society and its beaten dispirited people.

It is why the road to constitutional reform-even a yard today, instead of long mile-might be embarked upon, if not traveled, however fleetingly.  This can be his magnum opus; his lasting legacy.  After all, the man is a historian.  He can earn an enduring pride of place in the Guyanese story.  There can also follow a rebirth of the Guyanese character, and a resurgence of the nation’s spirit.