Internet Radio

Sanjay’s Jewellery Store owner jailed for dangerous driving death; refused bail on appeal notice

CONVICTED: Bishnarine ‘Sanjay’ Persaud

The owner of Sanjay’s Jewellery was Friday jailed for 58 months for causing death by dangerous driving, and he failed to secure bail after notice was given that he would appeal the decision.

 Bishnarine ‘Sanjay’ Persaud of 26 Sheriff Street, Campbelville, Georgetown was found guilty for causing the death of Georgetown Municipality worker, Leon Hunte.

The sentence was handed down by City Magistrate, Judy Latchman who found that there was compelling evidence that Persaud committed the offence at about 11 PM on September 10, 2014.

Persaud’s lawyer, Glenn Hanoman told the court that he would appeal the custodial sentence. However, he was unsuccessful in securing bail for his client pending the hearing and determination of the appeal.

Hanoman now has to formally file an appeal and then apply to the High Court for bail.

Prior to the sentence, in a plea of mitigation the Defence Lawyer told the court that Persaud had paid for the funeral and the wake and that he is the sole breadwinner for his children who are still attending school.

The prosecution’s case was that Persaud did not exercise care, courtesy, caution, consideration and commonsense or the accident would have been avoided.

The owner of Sanjay’s Jewellery was Friday jailed for 58 months for causing death by dangerous driving, and he failed to secure bail after notice was given that he would appeal the decision.

 

Bishnarine ‘Sanjay’ Persaud of 26 Sheriff Street, Campbelville, Georgetown was found guilty for causing the death of Georgetown Municipality worker, Leon Hunte.

 

The sentence was handed down by City Magistrate, Judy Latchman who found that there was compelling evidence that Persaud committed the offence at about 11 PM on September 10, 2014.

 

Persaud’s lawyer, Glenn Hanoman told the court that he would appeal the custodial sentence. However, he was unsuccessful in securing bail for his client pending the hearing and determination of the appeal.

 

Hanoman now has to formally file an appeal and then apply to the High Court for bail.

 

Prior to the sentence, in a plea of mitigation the Defence Lawyer told the court that Persaud had paid for the funeral and the wake and that he is the sole breadwinner for his children who are still attending school.

 

The prosecution’s case was that Persaud did not exercise care, courtesy, caution, consideration and commonsense or the accident would have been avoided.