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PNCR Region Three Chairman opposed Granger; complains about in-fighting

PNCR Leader, David Granger looking at a pin that his party's Region Three Chairman, Mark Walkes (right) presented him.

PNCR Leader, David Granger looking at a pin that his party’s Region Three Chairman, Mark Walkes (right) presented him.

The Region Three Chairman of the People’s National Congress Reform (PNCR), Mark Walkes has for the first time publicly stated that he had opposed party leader David Granger, but the two men have one thing in common- they love their party’s founder leader, Forbes Burnham.

Walkes also promised to lodge formal complaints with the PNCR’s headquarters against certain persons who allegedly attempted to sabotage the awards ceremony.

Addressing a PNCR Region Three (West Demerara- Essequibo Islands) Award Ceremony on Saturday at the West Demerara Secondary School for party stalwarts, Walkes remarked in the presence of Granger at the head table that he respects rather than supports the Guyanese leader. . “I did not support Mr. David Granger; the world knows that but I never disrespect him and I don’t want anybody going out saying I disrespect Mr. Granger. I never did so,” he said.

Walkes and veteran party member, Aubrey Norton were part of a group that had supported Carl Greenidge, who was among the attendees at the awards ceremony, to become party leader in 2012. Referring to Norton as his mentor, Walkes said wherever Norton goes he would be following him.

Although Walkes confessed that he did not prefer Granger, he took the opportunity to present him with a pin as a token of appreciation by Region Three but he declined to pin it on the party leader. “I would not pin it on you because I don’t want to bore you,” he quipped.

Walkes said he was not only very happy and excited to have organised the award ceremony to honour the several party stalwarts but also to be his party’s Region Three Chairman. “As Chairman of this region, I am very happy and proud to be regional chairman of Linden Forbes Sampson Burnham party, then led by Hugh Desmond Hoyte and Robert Herman Orlando Corbin and now David Arthur Granger,”  he said.

In his address, President Granger spent almost all of his time on recognizing Burnham’s contributions to the founding of the 59-year old PNCR  and laying the social, economic and political groundwork for developing  a cohesive independent Guyana. “When the PNC was formed in 1957, our  Founder-Leader set out to put an end to the abuses of colonial society, the abuses of segregation and discrimination, the abuses of having one set of people poor and another set of people rich, the abuses of political division and our Founder Leader created a party of a new type,” said Granger, a historian.

Saying that he was well versed in politics because most of his colleagues are politicians, Walkes vowed to surmount challenges. “Those who are trying to fight me, comrades, they can’t make it; they can’t survive with me, comrades…so I will fight with them to keep Forbes Burnham’s party going in this region,” he said, adding that it was “not a buse out; there is a place for the buse out.”  He complained openly to the PNCR Leader that up to Saturday afternoon, two awardees had informed him that the awards ceremony had been called off. “I know the team who was going around doing it, comrades, and I will give the names to the leader and I will be looking forward to them being disciplined,” he said.

He vowed to ensure that there is an end to in-fighting in the PNCR. “I will not allow this party to be distracted by a group who does not have the party at heart,” said Walkes. The PNCR Leader did not react to any of the Region Three Chairman’s concerns, but thanked him for his invitation to the awards ceremony.

When it was time to present awards, Walkes ordered a reluctant President Granger to do so to the first batch of recipients. He also pointedly instructed the President to take up his position off stage to present the awards. “No, we want you. You are not running the show. I am running the show,” the Regional Chairman said to loud applause. “So I’ll ask you to step forward Comrade Leader. You have to listen to your children,” he added.

In the end, it appeared to have been the right approach because many of the elderly recipients would have been unable to climb the stairs to the go on stage. In fact, the President had to go directly to a number of the physically frail persons present the awards.

  • Emile_Mervin

    Holy smokes! I, too, preferred Carl Greenidge over David Granger. However, Granger ‘defeated’ Greenidge. Greenidge accepted defeat under protest of the party’s election being rigged, and accepted Granger’s appointment of him as Foreign Minister. Even Aubrey Norton was appointed an Advisor with the government. These two guys have moved on, Mr. Regional Chairman.

    Now, if the Regional Chairman of Region Three ran on the Coalition’s List of Representatives in the General and Regional Election, and then accepted the post as Regional Chairman when the Coalition won Region Three then he ought to know that publicly embarrassing the President is the same as publicly disrespecting the President. I’d be surprised if this guy remains Regional Chairman.

  • Gtloyal

    If Mr Mark Walkes expect Mr Granger to discipline anyone he would be being rather naive. There is a man who never act on any complaint.
    Mr Carl Greenidge would have made a more fitting leader, one more akin to the interests of the people.
    Burnham, as leader of the party and government achieved many things for which Guyanese must be proud.
    He was a strong, effective leader, capable and convincing. What he strived for, however, were later suspected to have been determined by very personal ambitions instead of any true concern for the welfare of the people. He displayed a self-interested leadership approach, with detrimental undertakings that included pursuing and abusing power, developing a sense of self-importance, using fear, and having a sense of isolation that eventually contributed to a harmful leadership style that ultimately did much harm to the party.
    These are truths that must be taught to the younger generations, not only should there be praises, many a times abstract praises.

  • Col123

    We need twenty feet statues of Burnham for each county…displayed in the market square . This will be sure signs of things that come!

  • Col123

    Lance…..Bunham is God to 51 % of Guyanese…the last election is evidence…the man squandered what he collected from Guyana and did not leave any national heritage site …we need them statues…

  • Col123

    Where can I get some cheap weed???

  • Emile_Mervin

    In this context, Granger is not just ‘somebody’ with whom Walkes is disagreeing; this is the leader of the party of which Walkes is a subordinate member.
    Second, the issue on which Walkes disagrees with Granger has not been publicly advanced beyond the stated fact Walkes preferred Norton over Granger. There was absolutely no reference to ideology in the article, and even if there was an ideological difference then why would Norton serve as an Advisor under a President with whom he has ideological differences?
    Therefore, when you suggest disagreeing is not the same as disrespecting you have to recognize the relevance of context here.
    If the context of the news article above is to be believed, it does seem there was an element of disrespect was shown with no clear reference to ideological schisms. It is just personal!

  • Col123

    Burnham had a lot of visions…and some auditory hallucinations too…the man must have smoked too much expensive weed!…that’s why we can’t find the money and development he personally gave/bequeath to Guyana !!!

    • Gtloyal

      Hey Col123: Burnham came, dipped and left. Cheddi came, dipped and bequeathed the jar to his underlings in the line to continue dipping … his legacy.

      • Col123

        GT..What empty jar???you are selling that the country was broke???..in May 2015?…how much millions were spent for the two big jump up?…Grangie coronation and jubilee?…

        • Gtloyal

          All you mention is irrelevant. The jump ups as you call them were not financed by taxpayers. That’s a PPP lie.
          All that was in the jar was already compromised by those pre 5/11 shady deals. Luckily, they were stopped.
          Hey, don’t tell me you’re missing that “parallel economy” …? Lol.

          • Col123

            GT …I gave you lots of credit for your courage …or lack thereof…for loyalty to politicians…you have swallowed the hook and line…the sinker is usually lead ….causes plumbism … good luck!

          • Gtloyal

            I don’t think I am anymore loyal to any politician than you are. Unlike you guys I have not hesitated to compliment nor to criticize any, from LFS and Cheddie to their present day heirs, depending on what was called for. Again unlike you, I am not afraid to express my disapproval of any act or any public person nor to let my position be known.
            Good luck to you too.

          • Col123

            You are graceful. I have lost any faith in politicians,and others since that August, more than five decades ago, when I left Guyana more than five decades ago…like others, with three dollars in my pocket . I have stated that in the past to you. I have worked alongside US State Dept staff… mostly politicians… in torn up countries-El Salvador, Paraguay,Equador..and others, at rebuilding..on and off for ten years. Politician require special skill sets…they are shameless , liars, egotistic, conniving,..etc..and would not hesitate to sell their mom for a dollar….

          • Gtloyal

            The catch is that a true politician, despite all of those things you list, believes that he is always doing the right thing. Understand that and then you will accept them. Or maybe I should say, accept that and you will understand them. Then there are those who are there pretending to be politicians just to get the change to fill their pockets. Unfortunately, these are the ones who have “hijacked” the PPP. That is what many don’t see or want to accept. I’ve been around.
            I trust your stint in America Latina was worthwhile. I also spent some time poking around South America.

  • Gtloyal

    Come on my dear Lucy, don’t get hysterical. Burnham, as all of Guyana’s executive presidents was not perfect.
    However, when you say, “made himself the 4th richest black man on the planet”, it shows how you have been carried away by Guyanese gossip, hearsay. Where did you get that from? That was never published anywhere, if that’s what you are going to say. Burnham’s descendants continue to live a middle class life, working to earn a living: no pradoville, no mansion with pool house, no enriched friends nor family, etc.
    There was crime during Burnham’s time in government, yes, but much less than during your Jaggie’s rule when extra judicial killings was the order of the day. More than 400 afroguyanese youths were assassinated under the watchful eyes of the same guy who recently surprised and maybe offended many of his supporters with his newly discovered truth when he uttered the words “we black people”. Just as he never saw himself as black then, he never thought it necessary to even investigate those killikgs.
    If Burnham was a dictator, at least he never eliminated Parliament, as the PPP’s Ramotar did. While you say Burnham rigged elections, the PPP decided not to hold LG elections for more than two decades, denying the people their constitutional right. Was that better?
    As I commented earlier, Burnham did many many wrongs but as most would say today, his wrongful deeds were kindergarten stuff when compared to what came later.
    And, Lucy, most importantly, his government and politics was accepted by Cheddi. It was Rodney and the WPA’s effort that really slowed him, not the PPP’s … the same WPA that Cheddi turned his back on, post ’92.

  • Col123

    L.. by any measure, Burnham is god to Guyanese … just ask Naggie …

  • Col123

    L….HITLER!!! no!….Ethnic cleansing..yes. …where were the ovens???